GRATIOT COUNTY WIND FARM
133 Turbine Wind Farm
Breckenridge, MI

DTE Energy in partnership with Gratiot Wind, an affiliate of Invenergy Wind of Chicago sought to build a 133 turbine wind farm on approximately 30,000 acres of private land in the townships of Bethany, Emerson Wheeler and Lafeyette. Livonia Michigan-based Aristeo Construction found the farmland (whose soils consisted of highly saturated peats, silts and clays) to be a quagmire that made steady progress of construction difficult, and in some places nearly impossible.

Wadel Stabilization performed cement stabilization using type 1157 Portland cement on the project's haul roads, tower access roads, and crane pads. In areas where high organics and/or a sufficiently high water table where true stabilization could not be attained WSI was able to dry and strengthen site soils enough to bridge over and allow stone to be placed which was then subsequentlyl stabilized, producing a cross-section with adequate strength.
SOARING EAGLE CASINO
80 acre site for new casino
Mt. Pleasant, MI

Job start date was late in the season and a large quantity of silts and silty clay materials needed to be moved. The summer had an above average rainfall and the existing soils were above optimum moisture when the earth moving started. When the project got underway the fall rainy season made grading and compacting the soil impossible and the weather kept delaying the job. The site had literally turned in to a sea of mud. The project had stalled and the earthmoving equipment had been parked because the soils were too wet and any attempt to work made the site even worse.

The construction manager called and scheduled an on site meeting. They had a big problem and needed a solution in a hurry. Wadel Stabilization agreed to mobilize immediately to dry up and modify the on site soil using C-ash at a depth of 18 inches. Because of the size of the job and the late start date, Wadel worked 24 hours per day to keep the job moving forward. After the first day of work the site contracter was back on site, fine grading and compacting the stabilized soil and placing the lime stone aggregate. The construction manager chose to have the entire site modified with C-ash. WSI mixed C-ash into the soil inside all buildings and under all roads, parking lots, walkways, and around all building perimeters. Within 6 weeks, WSI all contractors could move anywhere on site with out getting stuck. By stabilizing the subbase it was determined that the added strength of this material could be calculated and added to the engineered pavement cross section. This allowed the pavement cross section to be reduced. By reducing the depth of gravel and asphalt pavement, the owner was able to fully pay for the cost of dry up/modification with savings left over.
WAREHOUSE CONSTRUCTION SITE
10 Acre warehouse building with truck parking and entrance roads
Flint, MI

Project start date was in late December. Site conditions were wet silty clays that were too wet to compact. The project had a June 30th completion date with very big liquidated damages for any delays in the completion date.

Site work contractor contacted Wadel Stabilization for an on site meeting. Wadel proposed soil modification and site dry up using quick lime, LKD and blends of these materials. The construction manager felt that if the bottom of the fill area was stabilized, the job could be completed with the on site material. When the job was started in early January, the weather conditions were very mild for a Michigan winter. After 3 days of work the weather changed and the temperatures dropped into the single digits. Half of the 10 acre building site needed to be filled with some areas as much as 10 feet. The fill material dug from a bank had a moisture content well above optimum moisture. It was determined that using LKD to dry the material was much more cost effective than hauling the wet material off site and importing sand for the fill area. As the weather warmed it became apparent that the rest of the site was also too wet to build the parking areas and entrance roads. These areas were also stabilized allowing the job to be finished on schedule and saving the owner countless dollars.
GM PLANT CONSTRUCTION SITE
Railsiding and car parking lot for new General Motors plant in Delta Township, Michigan.
Lansing, MI

An unusually wet summer and soil conditions of silts and silty clays made it impossible to complete the aggregate and pavement for the car parking lot. The new automotive plant was scheduled to come online and be in full production by November 15th. The 85 acre site with a new railsiding had standing water and could not be graded for drainage or compacted for the density requirements. As of October 1st, the site had only 5 acres of paved parking completed much of this parking area had to be reworked because it was unstable and the asphalt was already failing.

After viewing the site, it was decided to modify the site with LKD applied at a rate of 5%. The on site silts and silty clay base was dried up and stabilized, graded and compacted. The gravel placement and asphalt paving followed within days of mixing the LKD into the soil. By December 7th, over 50 acres of parking lot had been dried and stabilized, fined graded and compacted. By the 15th of December, this area had been paved and the parking lot striped. The remaining parking lot area was left untouched until mid January. At that time the saturated material had frozen hard enough for the site work contractor to finish his earth excavation without being stuck all the time. By stabilizing this site, the owner was able to park the new cars and load them out for shipment by rail or truck as originally planned when this facility was designed.
GRAND RAPIDS PRESS BUILDINGGrand Rapids, MI

A new building for the Grand Rapids Press was being constructed through the fall and winter seasons. Site conditions were wet but the contractors were able to push on and get the building up and the roof completed by early spring. Inside the building, the snow and ice had collected over the winter months and with the spring warm up it melted creating a muddy mess of existing silt and clays. The contractors continued to work until their syntax and aerial lifts became stuck in the mud and the workers could no longer walk through the building.

The construction manager contacted Wadel Stabilization to inquire if they had a way to dry up and stabilize inside of buildings. Wadel made a site visit and assured the construction manager that they could work inside of the building and dry up the mud. Because of the soils and the amount of free water in the building, Wadel chose quick lime as the product to use for this job. Once on the job site, Wadel started mixing the quick lime and soil and continued building a working platform into the building. As Wadel worked their way through the building they pulled the various machines that were stuck and left in the mud onto the stabilized material and drove them out of the building. After approximately 6 hours of work, the construction manager was able to drive into the building in his pick-up truck and watch the work progressing. By 6:00 p.m. that night the soil inside of the building had been graded out and compacted allowing the workers total access to the building the following day. This type of work has become a big part of our spring and fall schedule because it is very cost effective and can be done very quickly compared to other ways of fixing this problem. This is a very common problem on building sites in the snow belt region of the United States.
Ph: (231) 873-4006
Fx: (231) 873-7300
info@wadels.com
2500 N Oceana Dr.
Hart, MI 49420
NCHRPNATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM
Administered by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and sponsored by the member departments (i.e., individual state departments of transportation) of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) was created in 1962 as a means to conduct research in acute problem areas that affect highway planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance nationwide.

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Web Only Document 144TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 144: Recommended Practice for Stabilization of Subgrade Soils and Base Materials explores a methodology to determine which stabilizers should be considered as candidates for stabilization for a specific soil, pavement, and environment.

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NCHRP Web Only Document 144: Recommended Practice for Stabilization of Subgrade Soils and Base MaterialsRECOMMENDED PRACTICES FOR STABILIZATION OF SUBGRADE SOILS AND BASE MATERIALS

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NCHRPNATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM
Administered by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and sponsored by the member departments (i.e., individual state departments of transportation) of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) was created in 1962 as a means to conduct research in acute problem areas that affect highway planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance nationwide.

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Synthesis 421TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Synthesis 421: Recycling and Reclamation of Asphalt Pavements Using In-Place Methods discusses the use of hot in-place recycling, cold in-place recycling, and full-depth reclamation of asphalt pavements. In-place recycling and reclamation of asphalt pavements provides agencies with the ability to optimize the value of in-place materials, minimize construction time and traffic flow disruptions, and reduce the number of construction vehicles moving in and out of the construction area.(click on image for more)
NCHRP Synthesis 421 Document: Recycling and Reclamation of Asphalt Pavements Using In-Place MethodsRECYCLING AND RECLAMATION OF ASPHALT PAVEMENTS USING IN-PACE METHODS

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Pavement Preservation & Recycling AssociationPavement Preservation & Recycling Alliance
Asphalt Recycling & Reclamation AssociationAsphalt Recycling & Reclamation Association