SOIL MODIFICATION - SITE DRY UP

"Another form of soil treatment closely related to soil stabilization is soil modification, sometiimes referred to as "mud drying", "site dry up", or "soil conditioning". Although some stabilization inherently occurs in soil modification, the distinction is that soil modification is merely a means to reduce the moisture content of a soil to expedite construction, whereas stabilization can substantially increase the shear strength of a material such that it can be incorporated into the project's structural design."-Asphalt Recycling & Reclaiming Association
"The definition of modification and stabilization can be ambiguous...modification refers [to] soil improvement that occurs in the sort term, during or shortlyl after mixing (within hours). This modification reduces the plasticity of the soil (improves the consistency) to the desired level and improves short-term strength to the desired level (short-term is defined as strength derived immediately within about 7-days of after compaction). Even if no significant pozzolanic or cementitious reaction occurs, the textural changes that accoompany consistency improvements normally result in measurable strength improvement."

-NCHRP WEB ONLY DOCUMENT 144: Recommended Practices for Stabilzation of Subgrade Soils and Base Materials

SOIL STABILIZATION

"Soil stabilization is the permanent physical and chemical alteration of soils to enhance their physical properties. Stabilization can increase the shear strength of a soil and/or control the shrink-swell properties of a soil, thus improving the load bearing capacity of a sub-grade to support pavements and foundations."

-Asphalt Recycling & Reclaiming Association

"Long-term performance of pavement structures is significantly impacted by the stability of the underlying soils. In situ subgrades often do not provide the support required to achieve acceptable performance under traffic loading and environmental demands. Although stabilization is an effective alternative for improving soil properties, the engineeering properties derived from stabilization vary widely due to heterogeneity in soil composition, differences in micro and macro structure among soils, heterogeneity of geologic deposits, and due to differences in physical and chemical interactions between the soil and candidate stabilizers. These variations necessitate the consideration of site-specific treatment options which must be validated through testing of soil-stabilizer mixtures."

-NCHRP WEB ONLY DOCUMENT 144: Recommended Practices for Stabilization of Subgrade Soils and Base Materials

FULL DEPTH RECLAMATION

Full depth reclamation is a reclamation technique in which the full flexible pavement section and a predetermined portion of the underlying materials are uniformly crushed, pulverized, or blended, resulting in a stabilized base course; further stabilization may be obtained through the use of available additives. By addressing the entire pavement section, full depth reclamation is able to correct delinquent cross sections, increase the load-bearing strength of the base, and utilize 100% of the existing materials. Substantial savings caqn be realized while meeting environemental goals."

-Asphalt Recycling & Reclaiming Association

"In-place recycling and reclamation of asphalt pavements provides agencies with the ability to optimize the value of in-place materials, minimize construction time and traffic flow disruptions, and reduce the number of construction vehicles moving in and out of the construction area."

-NCHRP SYNTHESIS 421: Recycling and Reclamation of Asphalt Pavements Using In-Place Methods

Ph: (231) 873-4006
Fx: (231) 873-7300
info@wadels.com
2500 N Oceana Dr.
Hart, MI 49420
NCHRPNATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM
Administered by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and sponsored by the member departments (i.e., individual state departments of transportation) of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) was created in 1962 as a means to conduct research in acute problem areas that affect highway planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance nationwide.

(click on image for more)

Web Only Document 144TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 144: Recommended Practice for Stabilization of Subgrade Soils and Base Materials explores a methodology to determine which stabilizers should be considered as candidates for stabilization for a specific soil, pavement, and environment.

(click on image for more)

NCHRP Web Only Document 144: Recommended Practice for Stabilization of Subgrade Soils and Base MaterialsRECOMMENDED PRACTICES FOR STABILIZATION OF SUBGRADE SOILS AND BASE MATERIALS

(click on image to go to document)

NCHRPNATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM
Administered by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and sponsored by the member departments (i.e., individual state departments of transportation) of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) was created in 1962 as a means to conduct research in acute problem areas that affect highway planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance nationwide.

(click on image for more)

Synthesis 421TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Synthesis 421: Recycling and Reclamation of Asphalt Pavements Using In-Place Methods discusses the use of hot in-place recycling, cold in-place recycling, and full-depth reclamation of asphalt pavements. In-place recycling and reclamation of asphalt pavements provides agencies with the ability to optimize the value of in-place materials, minimize construction time and traffic flow disruptions, and reduce the number of construction vehicles moving in and out of the construction area.(click on image for more)
NCHRP Synthesis 421 Document: Recycling and Reclamation of Asphalt Pavements Using In-Place MethodsRECYCLING AND RECLAMATION OF ASPHALT PAVEMENTS USING IN-PACE METHODS

(click on image to go to document)

Pavement Preservation & Recycling AssociationPavement Preservation & Recycling Alliance
Asphalt Recycling & Reclamation AssociationAsphalt Recycling & Reclamation Association