SOIL MODIFICATION - SITE DRY UP

  • WET CONSTRUCTION SITES
  • INSIDE BUILDINGS
  • TEMPORARY HAUL ROADS

  • STAY ON SCHEDULE
  • CHEAPER THAN UNDERCUTTING
  • USE ON SITE MATERIAL
  • AVOID TRUCKING MATERIAL
  • INCREASE STRUCTURAL CAPACITY
  • EASE COMPACTION

  • ADDITIVES
  • LIME
  • LKD (lime kiln dust)
  • CEMENT
  • CKD (cement kiln dust)
  • LIQUID ASPHALT
  • FLY ASH
  • Modification/dry up is closely related to Soil Stabilization. Each process involves the uniform application and blending of a material with site soils in order to enhance their engineering properties through chemical and physical alteration. The distinction between the two is that while stabilization drastically increases the shear strength of a material, (reducing soil plasticity and swelling and increasing load bearing capacity such that it can be incorporated into a pavement's structural design) modification/dry up is mainly a means to reduce the moisture content of a soil and increase its workability, expediting construction that would otherwise be delayed by rain or spring thaws.

    While modification/dry up does provide some of the benefits of stabilization, the greatest benefit is the savings in time and money. Wet site conditions result in costly problems that are most often resolved with costly solutions. Natural drying is a lengthy process often extended by unpredictable and uncontrollable weather. The time and money spent to excavate and export unsuitable and/or saturated material, and import and place new material (not to mention the environmental impact of material transportation and placement) is a substantial expense that could be dramatically reduced by drying with lime and lime by-products. Wadel Stabilization has the ability to mobilize quickly, drying wet sites in a fraction of the time required for natural drying, for a fraction of the cost of undercutting.
    By decreasing soil saturation and increasing structural capacity this modified base able to withstand imposed loads from construction traffic and heavy equipment,and allowed construction to proceed on schedule.
    Ph: (231) 873-4006
    Fx: (231) 873-7300
    info@wadels.com
    2500 N Oceana Dr.
    Hart, MI 49420
    NCHRPNATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM
    Administered by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and sponsored by the member departments (i.e., individual state departments of transportation) of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) was created in 1962 as a means to conduct research in acute problem areas that affect highway planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance nationwide.

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    Web Only Document 144TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 144: Recommended Practice for Stabilization of Subgrade Soils and Base Materials explores a methodology to determine which stabilizers should be considered as candidates for stabilization for a specific soil, pavement, and environment.

    (click on image for more)

    NCHRP Web Only Document 144: Recommended Practice for Stabilization of Subgrade Soils and Base MaterialsRECOMMENDED PRACTICES FOR STABILIZATION OF SUBGRADE SOILS AND BASE MATERIALS

    (click on image to go to document)

    NCHRPNATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM
    Administered by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and sponsored by the member departments (i.e., individual state departments of transportation) of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) was created in 1962 as a means to conduct research in acute problem areas that affect highway planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance nationwide.

    (click on image for more)

    Synthesis 421TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Synthesis 421: Recycling and Reclamation of Asphalt Pavements Using In-Place Methods discusses the use of hot in-place recycling, cold in-place recycling, and full-depth reclamation of asphalt pavements. In-place recycling and reclamation of asphalt pavements provides agencies with the ability to optimize the value of in-place materials, minimize construction time and traffic flow disruptions, and reduce the number of construction vehicles moving in and out of the construction area.(click on image for more)
    NCHRP Synthesis 421 Document: Recycling and Reclamation of Asphalt Pavements Using In-Place MethodsRECYCLING AND RECLAMATION OF ASPHALT PAVEMENTS USING IN-PACE METHODS

    (click on image to go to document)

    Pavement Preservation & Recycling AssociationPavement Preservation & Recycling Alliance
    Asphalt Recycling & Reclamation AssociationAsphalt Recycling & Reclamation Association